Members: Please place your sketch in alphabetical order by last name

(Use the Heading 3, not boldface, setting for the line with your name on it.)


Baha Balantekin

is a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is a theorist with interests at the interface of nuclear, particle physics and astrophysics. His current neutrino physics interests include the dynamical symmetries of the collective neutrino oscillations, sterile neutrinos, neutrino magnetic moment and aspects of double beta decay.
His email is baha@physics.wisc.edu

Mu-Chun Chen

is an Associate Professor at the University of California - Irvine. She is a theorist interested in beyond the Standard Model physics including the origins of flavor and CP violation. In the area of neutrino physics, she works on model building and leptogenesis.
Her email is muchunc@uci.edu

Tyce DeYoung

is an Associate Professor at Michigan State University. He is a member of the IceCube Collaboration, where he focuses on neutrino oscillation measurements with IceCube DeepCore/PINGU. He is also involved in planning for future extensions of IceCube which could significantly increase its sensitivity to high energy astrophysical neutrinos.
His email is deyoung@pa.msu.edu

Chris Fryer
is a permanent scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He works in modeling the progenitors, engines and outbursts of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts.
His email is fryer@lanl.gov

Boris Kayser

is a particle theorist at Fermilab, with special interest in neutrino physics and CP violation. Within neutrino physics, his current interests are processes involving sterile neutrinos, the connection between leptogenesis and neutrino CP violation, and the quantum mechanics of neutrino oscillation.
His email is boris@fnal.gov

Jonathan Miller

is an assistant professor at the Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria in Valparaiso Chile. He is an experimentalist with a wide range of interests from cosmology to nuclear physics. His current activities include investigating the interior of nucleons with neutrinos (MINERvA), developing a proposal for a new low energy southern hemisphere neutrino observatory at the proposed ANDES laboratory site, proposing a new method to investigate quantum gravity using astrophysical neutrino flavor observables, and finishing a dark matter analysis for IceCube.
His email is jonathan.miller@usm.cl

Ben Monreal

is an Assistant Professor at UCSB. He primarily does experiments on the tritium endpoint as a member of the KATRIN and Project 8 collaborations and is inching towards geoneutrinos. He is also interested in axions, double beta decay, EDM searches, direct dark matter detection, and any other opportunity to do tabletop-scale particle physics. His email is bmonreal@physics.ucsb.edu.

Ulrich Mosel

is a Professor for Theoretical Physics at the University of Giessen, Germany. He is a nuclear theorist who became interested in neutrino-nuclear interactions and their impact on neutrino energy reconstruction in long baseline oscillation experiments. His other interests are in modeling relativistic heavy-ion collisions and in photonuclear physics. His e-mail is
mosel@physik.uni-giessen.de

Tommy Ohlsson

is a full professor in theoretical physics at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. His research field is theoretical particle physics, particularly neutrino physics and physics beyond the so-called Standard Model. His email is tohlsson@kth.se.

Sandip Pakvasa

is Emeritus Professor at University of Hawaii, having retired a year ago.
His main interests are in flavors of very high energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources, unusual properties of neutrinos, Galactic Neutrino communication and SETI, and flavor physics especially CP violation in Charm physics, and D mixing. email:pakvasa@phys.hawaii.edu .

Tom Weiler

a Professor at Vanderbilt University in Nashville TN, is a co-organizer of Neutrinos14 here at KITP.
Among other topics, he studies astrophysical neutrinos, a pursuit now validated by the new IceCube data.
His email is tom.weiler@vanderbilt.edu

Walter Winter

is a permanent scientific staff at DESY (Zeuthen/Berlin location) and a co-organizer of Neutrinos14 here at KITP.
His main research interests are along the main diagonal in the following matrix:
neutrinophysics.png
His E-mail is walter.winter@desy.de